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20140226
20140306
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KQED (PBS) 16
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
need to change the environment that we live in. so that means better policies, access and availability to healthier food for all americans, so in underserved areas as well as privileged areas. and many efforts are under way to make that happen. >> is there any way, you mentioned the difference between what's happening in underserved areas as well as privileged areas. and you also mention the change in the women, infants and children nutrition program. how much of that can you break out. >> i know this is a small incident but how much do you know in these kinds of programs is it having an effect? >> well, we mow that children who are eligible for assistance like wic serve underprivileged chrn and those changes are very important for them. but if we pull apart the recent data we're talking about now and the decline in the obesity rates it starts to unravel when you look at the disparities. soรง we know that white children have lower rates than black children and hispanic children. and the disparities are quite striking. and that tells us more effort has to be put into reaching underserv
stepped in. >> this is a way of ensuring a warm, welcoming environment judgment-free, so that families can come and relax and have a good time and not worry about how the person on the spectrum is going to behave or what other people might think. >> reporter: lisa is director of accessibility programs of the theater development fund. the nonprofit organization coordinates performances like these four times a year. the mission is to make live theater more accessible to diverse audiences. here are some of the things you'll see at an autism friendly show that you wouldn't see on broadway otherwise. ushers have about 30 extra helpers on hand. they hand out colorful stress relievers called manipulative to help autistic audience members to relax before and during the performance. they make the autism friendly shows as close to the regular shows as possible. audio levels are reduced by about 20% and strobe lights are completely eliminated. yet organizers say it's what's happening offer stage that truly makes this broadway performance unique. the usually empty lobbies are transformed into spaces f
in the long term. the short term, sure there is a risk off environment that may see more volatility. >> i assume, andres, russia is included and the stock market was down 12% or so today. if you're in a general emerging markets fund, you're going to feel it, aren't you? >> absolutely. i think short term you'll see -- you'll take a hit there and in the next couple weeks. having said that, this is also going to create opportunities for long-term investors because not all these countries put in the emerging market index are the same. for instance, indiana is in the emerging market index is one of the countries that i favor at this point over the next two or three years, yet, it was down 1.5%. doesn't have a lot to do with ukraine or russia, the economy doesn't. it was down. so it should create opportunities. you need to differentiate between the risk and opportunity. >> what kind of investment changes should investors make? emerging markets, we just talked about that. investors have stock in big u.s. multi nationals that have a lot of trade with europe, which would be impacted by this ukrain
environment rich with new vocabulary. >> we use big words in here all the time because we are constantly communicating with them about their day. >> for parents, the cost of sending her here is well worth it. >> we wanted to take money that we might've spent on other things and invested in their education. it is not just education, but it is the sense of socialization, and i think it ultimately gets these kids ahead at a young age. >> that on the other side of town, a world apart, they are doing the dishes together. she has seen a change for the better in her daughter, who has started chatting more. >> before i did not give her the chance to express herself. i would be doing most of the talking. now, i give her a chance to express herself, so she does not get frustrated and angry. >> it has already helped some in their daily lives. i can loves her books, tell you, and hopefully that will help her chances. that brings us to a close, but you can continue watching us on our 24-hour news channel. thanks for watching. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation,
. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that is a little bit more forgiving. gwen: launching a new effort to help young men and boys of color. covering the week pete williams of nbc news. ed o'keefe of "the washington post." and michael sheerer of "time" magazine. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> it's one of the most amazing things we build and it doesn't even fly. we build classrooms and exhibit halls, mentoring tomorrow's innovators, we preserve habitats and serving america's veterans. every day thousands of boeing volunteers help their community be the best they can be, building something better for all of us. >> whether it's discovering an aspirin a day can prevent heart attacks worldwide or regenerating new heart muscles, our goal is to develop treatment. brigham and women's hospital. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- prudential. addition funding is
to help alleviate problems based in urban environments. >> tell me what have you guys built? what is it? >> it's a big -- it's an integrated lawn. >> what kinds of plants did you plant in yours? >> lettuce, basil, and carrots. >> this is something i could grow on my roof? >> yeah. >> if you want -- if you went to your landlord and asked him, can i grow some plants on the roof and he said sure, it's easier to get your food from a local place, and it's healthier and -- >> you're harvesting, do you select a large plant? >> with the help of the students, this particular greenhouse can produce up to 9,000 pounds of produce a year. more than the kids could ever eat, so this class of second graders voted to donate their greens to meals on wheels. >> we appreciate it. >> which delivered the produce to a senior citizens senior in midtown manhattan. >> so one of the great things about all the produce that they produce here is that it's a great way to connect to the community. >> just like the students, many businesses are also experimenting with hydroponic greenhouses, a point not lost on the kid
environment? all that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for tuesday, march 4th. >>> good evening, everyone. russia retreats and wall street gets a massive relief rally. investors bought up stocks after russian president putin pulled troops back from the border of ukraine, allaying worries about an imminent military showdown. the major averages surged 1.5% or more, posting their biggest gains so far this year. even setting a new record close for the s&p 500. now those sky-high gains wiped out all of yesterday's losses and even russia's stock market which lost 12% on monday rose more than 6% today. here's a look at the closing numbers. 9 dow soared 227 points, the nasdaq ended at a fresh 14-year high adding almost 75 points and the s & p jumped 28 points to 1873. that's a record high. over the commodities markets, what was up yesterday was down today. oil prices fell $1.59 a barrel to $103. and gold lost $12 an ounce to 1,337. >>> susie, even as russian president vladimir putin said today his country has no intention of fighting the ukranian people. international support for kiev i
and that's the point of change for solomon. that's the point of kind of understanding what the environment can do for him. and i think that's the sort of psychological difficulty. that's the psychological kind of warfare, psychological drama of it all. >> this is sort of a remarkable experience. one of the most amaze, i mean the most amazing experiences i've had as an actor and one of those experiences for one's self. it just takes a bit of breath and i'm just enjoying kind of opening the film and showing it to people and talking about it. and i feel like there's still so much to say about it. that it's not one, like another film that you open and you just sort of get tired of the conversation about it. it's something that i think really does still inform me. >> rose: a transformational character is every actor's dream. the next two nominees for best actor talked about the unique opportunity to take that on. leonardo dicaprio plays in martin scoresy the wolf of wall street. bruce dern has taken when he calls the roll of a lifetime. he's woody grant on a road trip across the mid west wit
wants these countries to look to russia for guidance on what to do on the international environment, and he also wants to re-create or create some kind of an economic union, but he certainly doesn't want responsibility for internal problems that a lot of these countries have, especially their economic problems. >> so even though he said the worst thing that happened in the history of the 20th century was the collapse of the soviet union, you believe that if he thought he could re-create the soviet union, he would want to because of all the problems that would go with that, especially economic? >> he just wants those countries of the near abroad, most of all ukraine looking to russia and as part of an arrangement with russia, not part of the arrangement with the west. he wants to avoid them establishing stronger linkages with the west and he wants them to have much stronger linkages with russia, where russia actually has some measure of control. >> charlie: and he says that specifically in part, does he not? >> well, yeah, i think -- he's a typical autocrat. he's made no secret of wh
states. dina cappiello, the national environment reporter for the associated press, joins me now. 27 1/2 million dollars in finds, $200 million for the cleanup. in the range of penalty, how does this rank? >> it's the biggest ever for a company that violates its water pollution permits. other companies that paid big fines in the past in 2008, the e.p.a. said this is the biggest ever for a company that violated permits it had from states. >> ifill: describe the pollution. >> we're talking about 6,000 violations over 300 state-issued permits, hundreds of streams, tributaries and rivers, 79 active coal minus, over 20 coal processing plants where they put the coal and wash it before it's shipped, over five appalachian states, so it's a pretty massive coverage area for the settlement. >> reportersettlement. >> ifill: how did the discharges occur? >> they're actually piped into the waterways and states issue permits for the companies that give them certain limits and in this case this company repeatedly from 2006 to 2013 exceeded those limits, that they were actually authorized to discharge.
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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